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Response To Intervention

RESPONSE to INTERVENTION

 

Response to Intervention (RTI) is a process intended to help educators maximize student achievement through early identification of learning or behavioral difficulties.  By using RtI, teachers and other school staff are able to identify challenges to student learning, provide appropriate evidence-based interventions, and monitor student progress based on achievement and other performance data.  By providing information about how a child responds to evidence-based interventions and other supports, RtI enables teachers to adjust their instruction to best meet the needs of their students

 

Response to Intervention (RTI) is a general education initiative, which requires collaborative efforts from all district staff, administration, general educators, special educators, related services, bilingual/ELL staff and parents

 

DuQuoin Middle School 

Response To Intervention Plan

 

Tier I General Education

General Education teachers will use scientifically researched –based reading and mathematics programs in their classroom. Professional development activities will be provided for staff with emphasis on scientifically based interventions.

 

Step 1:     Screening (Responsibility: general education with support)

             Curriculum-based measurement probes in reading (comprehension and fluency), and math, will be administered to all students in grades 5 through 8 in.  Benchmark assessments will take place in September, January, and May.  Students will be progress monitored in between the benchmark assessments in order to track their development in the subject area(s). 

 At-risk students will be those students who score below the 10th percentile on National norms or in some case, school norms. 

Other students who do not meet the above criteria also could be entered into at-risk population through teacher recommendation and performance on the previous years ISAT.

The intent is not to limit the amount of children receiving intervention and monitoring, but to ensure adequate resources to provide such services for those most in need.  If more that 10 percent of the class is “at-risk” begin with the lowest 10 percent and gradually add other stduents to the intervention Tiers as possible with available resources.

During the 2009-2010 school year, DuQuoin Middle School will utilize the benchmarks in reading to implement a RTI program. Curriculum alignment will also occur for reading. Aimsweb probes will be used.

During the 2010-2011 school year, DuQuoin Middle School will utilize the benchmarks in math to implement a RTI program. . Curriculum alignment will also occur for math. Aimsweb probes will start during the 2010-201 school year in math.

 

Step 2:        Modification of general education program, minimum of 6-8 documented weeks

(Responsibility: general education)

Classroom teachers will supplement the general educational program with interventions which include but are not limited to Students Center Activities and providing Differentiated Instruction in order to increase student progress.

Tier I interventions will be carried out in the general education classroom by the classroom teacher. Classroom teachers will inform parents of concerns and remedial strategies being used in the classroom.

 

Step 3:                     Monitoring responsiveness to general education

   (Responsibility: general education with support)

 At-risk students are assessed with curriculum-based measurements (probes) three to four probes and data charted at a minimum of every three weeks and whenever a possible advance to the next Tier is being considered by the classroom teacher.

  The “targeted” students’ progress is compared to national and class norms. Inadequate progress is defined as making less weekly progress than grade level students at the 25th percentile and functioning in the bottom 10 percent of the class.

  • If a student is making inadequate progress the teacher will evaluate the adequacy of the current intervention plan. After evaluation the teacher may either change or add additional interventions for an additional 6 to 8 weeks period or if the plan was deemed adequate, make a referral to the Response to Intervention Team.  
  • The classroom teacher will inform the parents of the current rate of progress and either plan to change the Tier I intervention or refer to the Response Intervention Team.
  • If a student is behind, but making progress, an additional 6 to 8 week period of interventions may be provided to close the achievement gap. The classroom teacher will evaluate the adequate of the current intervention plan and consider changing or adding additional interventions in order to make adequate progress.
  • The classroom teacher will inform the parent of current rate of progress, the additional time for interventions, and any changes in the intervention program.

 

The Process to determine adequate progress:

 * The students must score at or above the 25th percentile during the final week of 6 to 8   

    week Tier I intervention period.

*The interventions will discontinue and the student will be monitored on a weekly basis  

    for the next 3 weeks. If the student continues to make weekly progress at or above the 

    growth rate of a grade level students at the 25th percentile for each 3 weeks, the

    students will be determined to have made adequate progress.

 *Once adequate progress is met, the student is no longer considered “at-risk” and Tier

      I interventions are no longer required.

  * The classroom teacher will inform the parents that adequate progress has been made

     and will no longer require Tier I interventions.

  • 80% of student are meeting goals at Tier I
  • 10-15% of  at Tier II placement
  • 5% at Tier III

 

Tier II               Implementation of Supplementary, Diagnostic Intervention

 

Step 4:       Referral to Response to Intervention Team, diagnostic intervention minimum 9 weeks

(Responsibility: general Education teacher with support)

Tier II Intervention increases the intensity, frequency and possibly the intervention attempted. 20 to 30 minute sessions 3 to 4 times per week in the area of deficiency will be required in addition to instructional practices already in place.  Tier II interventions must also be carried out in small groups of 3 to 6 students. The size of the group may slightly vary based on available resources in addition to the requirements of the interventions being attempted. These interventions may be carried out in the classroom or in an intervention room.

The RTI process must be documented by the Response to Intervention Team. Prior to the RTI Team meeting the team may need to gather additional data from teacher interview, parent interview and classroom observation (to be completed by School Psychologist or School Social Worker).

A key question to be addressed by the teacher interview is whether the teacher has gathered sufficient data and if additional information needs to be obtained before meeting with the RTI Team.

A key component of the classroom observation is to determine the treatment fidelity of the Tier I interventions (is interventions being carried out properly). If the Response to Intervention Team determines that the intervention program at Tier I was not done with fidelity or data gathered is insufficient, the referral to Tier II may be postponed until the interventions have been implemented with fidelity and data gathered. The Response to Intervention Team will support the teacher throughout this process.

Parent is kept informed throughout the Tier II process and is invited to the intervention team meeting. Again, it should be noted that parental permission is not asked for, nor needed, as this is a general education function. Parental input is acquired throughout the process, and parents are given a copy of the Tier II intervention plan and kept informed by the classroom teacher and if necessary, RTI Team members of the student’s progress.

 The first objective of the Response to Intervention Team is to define and refine the problem in objective and measurable language. Suppose Johnny is struggling in his basal reader and is said to be making minimal progress. The problem could be defined as difficulty in reading fluency: Johnny is reading 15 words correctly per minute from second-grade level passages (national norms place him below the 10th percentile) and his rate of progress during Tier I is.5 (below the growth rate for stduents at the 25th percentile) and in comparison to classmates in the bottom 10 percent of his class.

 Rate of growth is an essential concept during the Tiers and monitoring allows the Response to Intervention Team to judge the amount of progress the student is achieving under current conditions. Goal setting is used to determine the rate of growth necessary to bring the student to appropriate grade instructional level in a reasonable amount of time. Monitoring the progress toward goals is based upon objective data obtained from other students taking the AimsWeb test on that instructional level.

A second objective of the Response to Intervention Team is to identify the focus of the intervention. If the student’s progress is well below classmates, then an individual intervention for that particular student needs to be considered. If the student’s growth rate is comparable to classmates and over all class growth is good, then additional time in the current programs needs to be considered. If the student’s progress is not significantly below class norms, but overall class progress is significantly below district growth, then a classroom intervention rather than an individual intervention needs to be considered.  One way to quantify this example is to look at the median student in the class. If that student is in an” at –risk” range, then no referral should be made, since instructional intervention needs to begin at the classroom level.

Motivation is third area to be considered by Response to Intervention Team at this step. Is there a skill problem (student does not have component skills) or performance (student has skills but does not consistently perform)?  Are there behavioral modifications/ incentives that can be utilized to increase performance/learning?

Tier II non responders receive a minimum 9 to 12 week supplementary intervention.  A tier II intervention is a validated, relatively, intense treatment used with non-responding students.  For Example: Four (4) r 20 minute sessions per week in the area of deficiency will be required, in addition to instructional practices already in place. DuQuoin Middle School will be utilizing various support personnel (Title I, Reading Improvement, School Psychologist, School Social Worker) and available supplementary programs including, but not limited to software programs such as Study IslandEach Tier II intervention will be utilized for the needs of the student and designed to help the student make adequate progress in a reasonable amount of time.

Treatment fidelity will be monitored by a designated representative of the Response to Intervention Team, typically General Education teacher, School Psychologist will do a fidelity check and reported to the Response to Intervention Team leader and School Administrator.

 

Step 5:                     Monitoring response to diagnostic treatment

                                 (Responsibility: general education with support)

 The Response to Intervention Team will determine which of the team members will monitor student progress with the administration of a weekly curriculum-based measurement probe in the deficit areas. The school psychologist will be available for support and technical knowledge throughout the Tier II process.

Inadequate progress is defined as making less weekly progress than a grade-level student as the 25th percentile and functioning in the bottom 10 percent of the class. School Psychologists will be available to assist in data interpretation. If a student is making at inadequate progress the Response to Intervention Team will evaluate the adequacy of the current intervention plan. After evaluating the Response to Intervention Team may either attempt a different intervention plan by utilizing different or adding additional interventions that are to be implemented at a Tier II intensity level (20-30 minutes per day 3 to 4 times per week in addition to core reading instruction) for additional 9 to 12 week period or the team may determine to attempt  interventions that are implemented at a Tier III level (30 to 60 minutes per day 5 times per week in an individualized group 1:1, 1:2, or 1:3 in addition to core instruction). The Response to Intervention Team will inform the parent of the current rate of progress and either the plan to change the Tier II intervention or implement a more intensive Tier III intervention.

If a student is behind, but making progress, as additional 9 to 12 weeks period of intervention may be provided to close the achievement gap. The response to Intervention Team may either attempt a different intervention plan by utilizing different or adding additional interventions that are to be implemented at a Tier II intensity level ( 20 to 30 minutes per day 3 to 4 times per week in addition to core reading instruction). The Response to Intervention Team will inform the parent of the current rate of progress, the additional time for interventions, and any change in the intervention program.

The process to determine adequate progress in Tier II is as follows:

 

  • The student must score at or above 25th percentile during the final week of the 9 to 12 week Tier II intervention period.
  • The Tier II intervention will discontinue, the student will return to the Tier I support plan, and the student will be monitored on a weekly basis for the next (3) weeks.
  • If the student continues to make weekly progress at or above the growth rate of a grade level student at the 25th percentile for each of the (3) weeks, the student will be determined to have made adequate progress.
  • Once adequate progress is met, the student is no longer considered requiring Tier II support and Tier I interventions will continue for 6 to 8 more week until the student meets the tier I adequate progress criteria.
  • The Response to Intervention Team will inform the parent that adequate progress has been made and will no longer require Tier II interventions.
  • 80% of student are meeting goals at Tier I
  • 10-15% of  at Tier II placement
  • 5% at Tier III

 

Tier III Implementation of More Intensive Supplementary, Diagnostic Intervention

 

Step 6: More intensive diagnostic intervention, minimum 9-12 weeks

 Tier III Intervention increases the intensity and frequency and possibly the intervention attempted. Thirty to sixty minutes per day in the area of deficiency will be required in addition to instructional practices already in place.

This Tier could involve continuation of an intervention in Tier II that showed progress but not at the rate necessary to close the achievement gap, or it could add to or replace a Tier II intervention. Thus the intensity of the treatment would be increased, or a new intervention could be introduced because of a lack of response. The group size also is reduced in Tier II from a size range of 3-6 students in Tier II to a size 1:1, 1:2, 1:3. Some promising research shows that the grouping may result in better results that a 1:1 process. What differentiates Tier III from Tier II is the intensity and frequency of the intervention.

The function of the Response to Intervention Team at this time is to review the previous definition of the problem and to refine or redefine the problem if necessary. The parents invited to the team meeting. The intervention team reviews the data to this point and verifies that the treatment fidelity has been maintained. In the event that treatment fidelity has not been maintained, then the student does not move to Tier III and the school administrator addresses with the interventionists at Tier II the reasons for not maintaining treatment fidelity. If the reason for not maintaining treatment fidelity was based upon resources, then the school administrator redeploys the resources necessary to achieve and maintain treatment fidelity. If the teacher interview, parent interview and classroom observation (to be completed by School Psychologist) were not completed in Tier II, these diagnostic procedures are to be completed at this point. A problem solving approach is utilized by the response to Intervention Team to generate additional diagnostic information that can be used in planning.

A response to Intervention Team Member will inform parent of interventions used in the classroom. Treatment fidelity will be monitored by a designated representative of the response to Intervention Team and report to the School Administrator.

 

Step 7:                      Monitoring response to diagnostic treatment

(Responsibility: general Education with support staff)

The Response to Intervention Team will determine which of the team members will monitor student progress with the administration of a weekly curriculum based measurement probe in the deficit areas. The school psychologist will be available for support and technical knowledge throughout Tier III process. The Response to Intervention Team will reconvene no sooner than 9 weeks and no later than 12 weeks after the plan was initiated to determine effectiveness. Although progress will be determined on a case by case basis some general guidelines for the team as follows:

 

  1. Inadequate progress is defined as making less weekly progress than a grade level student at the 25th percentile and functioning in the bottom 10 percent of the class.
  2. School Psychologists will be available to assist in data interpretation.
  3. If a student is making inadequate progress the Response to Intervention Team will evaluate the adequacy of the current intervention plan.
  4. Progress needs to be closely monitored at Tier III by members of the response to Intervention Team, including the School Psychologist.
  5. If sufficient progress is not being made, the response to Intervention Team needs to consider current rate of growth and change over time, variance of skills from grade-level performance, diagnostic information obtained from problem-solving process, and fidelity of treatment.
  6. The Response to Intervention Team will then determine whether to implement additional interventions or refer the student for a special education evaluation.

If a student is behind, but making progress, an additional 9 to 12 weeks period of interventions may be provided to close the achievement gap. The Response to Intervention Team may either attempt a different intervention plan by utilizing different or additional interventions that are to be implemented at a Tier III intensity level. The Response to Intervention team will inform the parent of the current rate of progress, the additional time for interventions and any changes in the intervention program.

The process to determine adequate progress in Tier III is as follows:

  1. The student must score at or above the 25th percentile during the final week of the 9 to 12 Week Tier III intervention period.
  1. The Tier III intervention will discontinue, the student will return to the Tier II support plan, and the students will be monitored on a weekly basis for the next three weeks.
  2. If the student continues to make weekly progress at or above the growth rate of a grade-level students at 25th percentile for each of the (3) weeks, the student will be determined to have made adequate progress.
  3. Once adequate progress is met the student is no longer considered requiring Tier III support and Tier II interventions will continue for 6 to 8 more weeks until the students meets Tier II adequate progress criteria.
  4. The Response to Intervention Team will inform the parent that adequate progress has been made and no longer require Tier III interventions.

 

Step 8:              (Step 1 for special education consideration of disability)

 Tier III non-responders will be referred by the district to receive an individual evaluation that addresses all of the eligibility determination, evaluation, and procedural safeguards specified in IDEA and the need for special education services. Once either referral is completed, the building principal will determine if the referral is appropriate. If the referral is determined to be appropriate, the evaluation team will design an evaluation that considers the information that has already been gathered through the Tier RTI process and if needed what additional information is necessary to determine the individuals student’s needs. Parent consent must be obtained before the team can proceed with the evaluation. Once the evaluation is completed the IEP team will meet to review the information, determined eligibility if needed, determine educational programming and write the IEP (Individual Educational Plan).

 

 

 

 

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